APJ Essay Prize

The Association for the Philosophy of Judaism is dedicated to encouraging new work in the philosophy of Judaism.

Our annual APJ Essay Prize will be awarded to new work in the philosophy of Judaism. The winner will receive $500 and will also have their paper published in Faith & Philosophy, subject to the ratification of the editorial team of the journal. We are grateful to Faith & Philosophy for their support of our prize.

We define the philosophy of Judaism broadly, to include any of the following:

  • Philosophical engagement with any of the key texts of Rabbinic Judaism (Biblical or Rabbinic)
  • Philosophical engagement with any of the key tenets of Jewish faith
  • Philosophical engagement with any of the key concepts of Jewish peoplehood, such as communal identity over time.
  • Philosophical engagement with classical texts of Jewish philosophy (including, but not limited to, the Medieval, Kabbalistic, Hassidic, and Mussar traditions) and with philosophers of Judaism, i.e. with texts and philosophers that dealt with any of the issues raised above.

 

2014-5 Prize: We are pleased to announce that the winner of the 2014-5 APJ Essay Prize is Gabriel Citron (Yale and Toronto), for his essay entitled “Dreams, Nightmares, and a Defense against Arguments from Evil.” His essay has been accepted for publication in Faith & Philosophy.

2013 Prize: We are pleased to announce that the winner of the 2013 APJ Essay Prize is Tyron Goldschmidt, for his essay entitled, “Commanding Belief”. Though we generally submit our prize-winning essays to Faith & Philosophy, Tyron’s paper responded to work that had been published in Ratio; for that reason, it was submitted there and has been accepted for publication.

2012 Prize: We are pleased to announce that the winner of the 2012 APJ Essay Prize is Stefan Goltzberg (Cambridge University, Researcher Foundation Wiener-Anspach), for his essay entitled “Is the Bible a Fiction?” His essay has been accepted for publication in Faith & Philosophy.